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Welcome to Rafail Insurance Group!

The Rafail Insurance Group is an award winning full service insurance agency. We have been providing friendly, professional and affordable insurance to Houston since 2009. Our mission as a company is to make you our top priority. Customer satisfaction is not a goal, but a standard that we take pride in sharing with you. Our response time is never more than 24 hours, and our goal is to serve you on the spot. We are backed by the reputable Farmers Insurance Group for coverage you can count on.

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Contact Rafail Insurance Group for Auto Insurance, Auto Insurance Quotes, Car Insurance, Car Insurance Quotes, Farmers Insurance, Homeowners Insurance, Insurance, Insurance Companies, Insurance Quotes, and Renters Insurance. Proudly supporting the areas of Bellaire, Garden Oaks, Houston, Houston Heights, Midtown, Oak Forest, Pearland, Rice Military, The Woodlands, West University Place, and surrounding areas.

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Contact Rafail Insurance Group for Auto Insurance in Houston Heights, Auto Insurance Quotes in Houston Heights, Car Insurance in Houston Heights, Car Insurance Quotes in Houston Heights, Farmers Insurance in Houston Heights, Homeowners Insurance in Houston Heights, Insurance in Houston Heights, Insurance Companies in Houston Heights, Insurance Quotes in Houston Heights, Renters Insurance in Houston Heights, and in surrounding areas.

Below is some general information about Houston Heights:

Houston Heights (often referred to simply as “The Heights”) is a community located in northwest-central Houston, Texas (USA). “The Heights” is often referred to colloquially to describe a larger collection of neighborhoods adjacent to and including the actual Houston Heights. However, Houston Heights has its own history, distinct from Norhill and Woodland Heights.

Since the 1990s, and similar to other parts of Houston inside the 610 Loop, the Heights has experienced gentrification, a process ongoing to this day, as young highly-paid professionals (many of whom work in Downtown Houston) have flocked to the area, purchasing and renovating some of the historic homes (and demolishing some of them to build newer, upscale housing, much to the dismay of neighborhood preservationists). Upscale boutiques and restaurants have opened in the area, giving the streetscape an appearance not too much unlike Bellaire, Lower Westheimer or Upper Kirby. The 7,000-square-foot former fire station at 12th Street at Yale Street was constructed as Houston Heights’ city hall and jail, and fire station in 1914. After annexation, it served as a city of Houston fire station from 1918 until 1995. The Houston Heights Association took a 30 year lease on the property from the city and refurbished the property. By December 2009 the former city hall was for sale.

The Houston Heights, one of the earliest planned communities in Texas, is located 4 miles (6.4 km) northwest of Downtown Houston. A National Geographic article says “stroll the area’s broad, tree-canopied esplanades and side streets dotted with homes dating from the early 1900s and you may think you’ve landed in a small town.” John Nova Lomax said that the Heights, which he describes as “Houston’s own mini-Austin,” had many “low-key” restaurants and beer gardens. According to a study of the University of Houston Institute of Regional Forecasting and Crawford Realty Advisors, from 2002 to 2003 prices of single family houses appreciated by 8.7 percent. Anjali Athavalley said “real estate agents say most houses there costing less than $200,000 need serious work” and “buying a single-family house in the Houston Heights, for example, is getting expensive.”

As of 2011 most of the Heights is a part of Houston City Council District C, while a portion is in District H. Because of the inclusion of the Heights, Montrose, and Rice University areas, it has the nickname “Hipstrict” for what Chris Moran of the Houston Chronicle refers to as its “progressive, urban ethic.” Before the 2011 redistricting, District H included all of the Houston Heights. H was mostly Hispanic, but because of the inclusion of the Houston Heights, it was becoming increasingly non-Hispanic White. Around 2011 an earlier plan would have combined the Heights and Montrose under a district called District J.

The Houston Heights Association was organized in 1973 by residents and business owners to work together toward maintaining the quality of life and preserving the historic character of the community. The association owns several properties, one of which is Marmion Park, which is at the original location of the Cooley mansion, one of the first houses built in Houston Heights. The house was demolished in 1965. The land was purchased in 1979 by the Houston Heights Association for the purpose of constructing Marmion Park, named in honor of the last mayor of Houston Heights, J. B. Marmion. The Houston Heights Woman’s Club was founded in 1900, and constructed its own club building in 1912, which is still in use. Members were active in the suffrage movement, and later, during both World Wars volunteered the club for use by the Red Cross. Today the club volunteers in efforts to improve the Heights neighborhood, in particular mentoring children and assisting the elderly.

Source: Houston Heights on Wikipedia